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      JEE3


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      Post #37370, posted on 06-07-2011 GMT-5 hours    
      Once a 'rising' star in the South American skies, (so much so that Eastern Airlines took a 1/3rd share - note the Eastern-like 2nd color scheme!), LANSA's fall came about after (2) tragic L-188 fatal accidents, a little over a year apart, with the loss of 190 souls.....
      Planned as a non-IATA carrier offering deep discount flights to Europe, Lineas Aereas Nacionales S.A. would begin operations in December 1963. For their first A/C, LANSA chose (2) ex-Eastern L-649's (converted to 749's), leased from California Airmotive.
      The 'parabola' tail design (made famous by Lufthansa) was a quite popular in the era, also being used by AFA, among others. The LANSA "L" was also used on the tail. The L-749's. Domestic service from the capital Lima to (7) cities began in January 1964. The purchase of (2) ex-Qantas L-1049A's for the European flights was planned. One of the 1049's was painted in full LANSA colors but the airline changed it's plans and the (2) Constellations were NTU.
      LANSA would now concentrate on Intra-Peruvian operations. In late 1965, Eastern Airlines took a 33.3% share of LANSA, in exchange for a technical and managerial assistance contract. During 1965, (3) additional L-749's were added, along with the airline's motto "With LANSA Peru advances"!
      On April 26, 1966, OB-R-771 crashed into Mount Talsula, while on a flight from Lima-Cusco. All (43) passengers and (6) crew were lost. Pilot error was found, along with previous mechanical problems. In the Summer of 1966, LANSA shutdown operations and reorganized. Eastern's 1/3rd share was purchased by the new owners and a search began for a more modern aircraft.
      In early 1967, LANSA announced a 2-yr. contract had been signed with NAMC for technical assistance involving the lease/purchase of (3) YS-11's (would actually be [2] leased & [2] purchased). The 1st A/C for LANSA was ready for delivery in December 1967.
      Interestingly, the 'new' LANSA color scheme sure looked like it's former 1/3rd owners color scheme! Since the Eastern's "New Mark" was only a year-old, it's a bit surprising that their Legal Department didn't get into the act? For the 1st time, the full LANSA logo would appear on the tail and the 'LANSA' titles were now spelled out. The YS-11 was well received by the Peruvian passengers and helped the airline continue to increase passenger loads.
      By the end of 1967, all (4) of the YS-11's had arrived in Oakland, CA., which NAMC used as a base in the U.S.


      The venerable L-749's role was reduced, though they remained in service and would wear the 2nd color scheme.
      By 1968, LANSA was now serving (10) cities throughout Peru.
      It appears that at least (1) YS-11 had larger "LANSA" applied to it's fuselage.
      Though LANSA was pleased with it's YS-11's, it began the search for a larger A/C that could easily operate out of Peru's 10,000ft+ airports. LANSA found the perfect choice at Boeing but not for a Boeing aircraft!. As part of BI's (3) 727-200 order ("LS" 727-227 SPECIAL), the airline began trading-in several L-188's. LANSA believed that the 10-yr old 'Electra' would fit it's growing needs perfectly and (4) were chosen for purchase.
      The 1st ex-"Jellybean" (N9708C) was prepared in Florida and delivered in December, 1969 as OB-R-939.
      The arrival of the L-188 would be celebrated in one of the few LANSA ads, this (1) from 1970.
      On August 5, 1970, the 2nd L-188 (ex-N9704C) OB-R-941 was delivered to Lima.
      On August 9, 1970, just (5) days after the arrival of the 2nd L-188, the 1st OB-R-939 was to leave on it's scheduled Lima-Cusco 8:30am flight. Over half of the (92) passengers were a group of (49) High School exchange students from Buffalo, N.Y., having just returned with their families, teachers and guides from a visit to nearby Machu Picchu. The group wanted to visit a nearby handicraft market prior to departure and the flight finally departed at 2:45pm.
      Upon takeoff, the #3 engine caught fire and the L-188 crashed while attempting to turn back to land at Quispiquilla Airport. Sadly, of the 99 aboard, only the 28 yr-old co-pilot would be found alive, though severely burned.........
      The investigation would determine that the pilot used improper 'engine-out' procedures, along with the A/C being overloaded and during the investigation tried to cover-up the time on the #3 engine. The investigation also found that LANSA employed (13) unlicensed mechanics. The airline was fined and operations shut down for (90) days.
      Though of poor quality, this image shows that LANSA had made it's 1st alteration to the 2nd color scheme with the addition of 'bird' logo design.
      This logo would never be used again on any of the fleet. As the 3rd L-188 arrived (OB-R-945), (2) of the (4) YS-11's were returned to Japan.
      Though LANSA would use the bold letters in their advertisements & timetables,
      the L-188's and YS-11's would continue to use original 2nd scheme titles.
      On Christmas Eve 1971, LANSA Flight 508 (OB-R-941), left Lima on it's scheduled flight to Pucallpa, with (92) passengers and crew. At 21,000ft, the 'Electra' encountered a severe thunderstorm and the A/C was struck by lightening. The L-188 went into a spiral dive and crashed into the Peruvian jungle. There are (2) versions; one states that (14) survived the initial impact. A 17 yr-old female began a search for help, while the others stayed behind. Nine days later, living on a Christmas cake that she was planning as a gift, she was discovered by (2) local lumberman and she was taken by canoe on a 7-hr trip back to the lumber station. When the wreckage was located, the remaining surviving passengers has succumbed to their injuries..... The other version is that the 17 yr-old was the only survivor of the crash. The young 17 yr-old would later become a successful biologist in Germany. What would have been their 4th L-188, though painted in full LANSA colors, would never be delivered.
      Though the Peruvian Government finally put an end to LANSA after (8) years, it was all too late for the (239) souls, who should never be forgotten..........John3 (Thanks to Chuck Gowing/Airlinecolors.com, Bjorn Larsson/Timetableimages.com, "Roll Out"/aerospotter.blogsport.com, Arkivperu.com, Zoggavia.com, Zortek Gallery.com & LANSA 502 Accident Victims website/www.august91970.com......Photographers: John P. Stewart, Harry Gann & Harry Sievers).

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      Sergio Goncalves


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      Post #37483, posted on 06-21-2011 GMT-5 hours    
      Nice work. Thanks for your hard work to keep this part os airline history alive!!!

      Regards from Brazil,

      Sergio
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      JEE3


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      Post #37492, posted on 06-22-2011 GMT-5 hours    
      Sergio, thanks for the kind words......



      John