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      Super VC 10


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      Post #41422, posted on 02-22-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      I'm not sure if this has been discussed before because the search function on this site seems to be permanently broken throwing SQL errors every time I try to perform a search. Anyway... any tips on painting wheels/tyres? I usually paint them by hand but the results are patchy, I never seem to get an even finish. Any tips or tricks I might use in the future??

      Have a look at my aviation photos here!

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      ajmadison


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      Post #41423, posted on 02-22-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      couple of tips. I've gotten good results just by sticking a paint brush handle or other small diameter stick into the hole of a wheel, then spinning the wheel by hand while holding the paint brush 000 or 0000 against the wheel. If not obvious, you should paint the hub the hub color (white, silver, what have you), then paint the "tire."

      FSM has been touting using a small RPM device, battery operated driver drill, dremel capable of very low rpm, with a wheel, bomb, whatever, on a stick or sprue, and applying the paint like I described above.

      Another technique involves using or creating circular masks. In one case, a drafting template for circles is used to paint the hub color after the tire color is painted. In another example, small circles are cut from masking tape, by a tool that can produce them, like a punch & die set, or a compass with a knife blade. The hub color is painted, the circular mask is applied over the hub, and the tire color painted.

      Hope this helps.

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      Post #41424, posted on 02-22-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      Andrew, I'm not getting any errors performing a search in Forums. Can you please elaborate? Anyone else having problems with search?

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      ahmed |
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      Exile


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      Post #41425, posted on 02-23-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      First paint the hub and let it dry. Then mix some thinner and a small amount of matt black paint in a mixing jar or some other container so that the mix is quite runny. Carefully apply the mix to the wheel with a paintbrush. Capillary action will let the paint flow neatly around the rim of the wheel. Let it dry and finish rest of the tyre with undiluted paint.

      Al

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      Post #41426, posted on 02-23-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      I asked this question here some years ago and got a great tip: Paint the wheel the colour of the hub. Then hold it firmly (pliers, vice, whatever) and paint "the tyre" with a broad felt-tip indelible marker.

      Before this, I followed an earlier tip of using brushes specially trimmed in a U-shape, so that the side bristles would paint the tyre wall, while the bit in the middle would paint the tread. Achieving a good result was a pain!

      There is a huge selection of felt-tip colours at artists' and office suppliers. Tyres are never black -- they tend to be dark grey with a brownish tint.

      Also, tyres are not really matte -- photos often show positively glossy ones. Here, markers are great: once dry, their finish is "eggshell" (halfway between matte and glossy). Perfectionists might apply the diverse red, yellow or whatever markings often seen on tyres...

      You can "weather" the result to your heart't content -- and very dirty wheels get, indeed!

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      Super VC 10


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      Post #41458, posted on 02-24-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      Some very good tips there, I might give the Dremel one a go later and see how that works out. Thanks for the replies!

      Have a look at my aviation photos here!

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      Post #41484, posted on 02-26-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi,

      "Another technique involves using or creating circular masks. In one case, a drafting template for circles is used to paint the hub color after the tire color is painted. In another example, small circles are cut from masking tape, by a tool that can produce them, like a punch & die set, or a compass with a knife blade. The hub color is painted, the circular mask is applied over the hub, and the tire color painted."

      This is exactly what I do. See "Member Galleries", "berlin-uwe", "Tools for Wheels".
      These or similar tools are aviable in different sizes and perfect for me.
      Painting the hub, let dry, meanwhile doing the masks, putting them on patiently for exact center, painting the wheels. With the airbrush. Perfect and fast. Imagine B747 or A380.
      A liitle tricky, if the inside hub is higher than the wheel (SSJ-100 by Zvezda, for example).
      Wheathering as you like.

      Uwe