Airlinercafe Home Page

Stop being a lurker - join our community and get involved. Sign up and start a conversation!
 

      Author Message

      anj4de


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 19
      Location: Mittbach/Bavaria
      Occupation:
      Age: 55

      Post #69755, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello again

      After researching the big Boeing 747 and laying out some projects I have started to look around at the opposite side of the range...the 737. I have flown quite a lot in them during business trips around Europe and honestly found then rather boring soo far. Now, after looking around the web a bit I found some very interesting examples of the species. Especially the older versions 100/200 I like a lot. Some very cool ones are the "grable kit" equipped birds that flew (some still fly?) around the back wood of our planet. In 1/144 I have found three options so far that I concider buying:
      -Airfix
      -Eastern Express
      -Daco (with engine exchange)
      I am no big resin fan apart from AM add on parts so the AA birds are not an option. Also I do not mind, I actually enjoy, cutting and sculptering poly.
      The Airfix bird I ordered alrerady, for under 10EUR I thought it's worth a try. The Eastern Express option I have not read any in debth reviews about. Is it worth anything?
      The Daco 737 has received excellent critics and I wonder if a 737/500 with AA -200 engines would make sense?
      A question on Airfix...it has, as far as I have read so far, the earliest engines for the type and only very few -200 had those. What about the 737-100, did they all have those early engines? How much and where would I need to cut up the fuselage to get a -100? This ealy LH bird I guess has the engines that the Airfix kit offers?



      thanks
      Uwe

      Author Message

      BruinPrideBand


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 493
      Location: SGF
      Occupation: International Aviation Law
      Age:

      Post #69756, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I've not built a 737-100/200 but I have one of the AA kits that I'll build eventually... Since you don't want the AA kit I'd say you would probably have the best results by converting the DACO kit. Its so much better than the Airfix kit in my eyes--which looks like a 737 in a general sort of shape. Somewhere there is a thread (I think on this site... Maybe on Britmodeller) on the DACO conversion. It seems fairly straight forward to me but its not as simple as cutting out part of the fuselage.

      As far as the engines. The style seen in your picture didn't last very long as they did not provide adequate reverse thrust. Boeing changed this (I believe) after the fist 25 or so frames. They were replaced by the "clam shell" reversers that stayed until the -300 models.

      Chris

      "Sorry Goose... But it's time to buzz the Tower."

      Author Message

      Jennings


      Contributors

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 3945
      Location: The great desert southwest, USA
      Occupation: Nurse Anesthetist
      Age: 116

      Post #69757, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Dan has done a conversion of the Daco -300 (Daco kits are all classics, not NGs) into a -200 using Kurt's engines. It's a fair good bit of work.

      Author Message

      LH707


      Upper Deck Member

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 1004
      Location:
      Occupation:
      Age:

      Post #69758, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      If the Daco wing is done right, then it would be wrong for a 200. IIRC, the chord was lengthened a small bit between the 200 and 300, in addition to the wingtip changes.

      Regarding the early engines, all early 100/200 had those until sometime in 1968, when they changed them out. They essentially grabbed 727 engines off the shelf, and then realized that the high-pressure air under the wing reduced downforce on the gear leg and impeded braking, so they extended the duct aft by 4 feet/~1.2m and changed the reversers.

      Lastly, the 100 and 200 have different WBFs, there's a sketch on here somewhere.

      Out of curiosity, what don't you like about resin?

      Author Message

      skippiebg


      Contributors

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 890
      Location: Sofia
      Occupation: interpreter and translator
      Age: 62

      Post #69759, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      My subjective opinions:

      - Airfix is okay, though a little bit underscale (about 5mm short). As stated above, the engines do not represent the earliest 737 units. They represent an intermediate version fitted until the arrival of the Advanced 737 in 1971. The Advanced 737 engines had broad pylons that blended into the wing leading edge. Another point is that the Airfix engines are even more underscale than the rest of the kit. None of this makes the kit bad, though some would criticise diverse points...

      - Eastern Express have made some beautiful kits -- Il-18, An-22 Anthaeus, An-10, An-12, An-26, L-1011 TriStar, MD-11... The 737 is not one of them! It is, frankly, awful -- though still better than the extremely dire EE Airbis A318 or Boeing 757-300! A paradox, however: the kit has the right engines for an Advanced 737-200, as flown in 1971 and sold thereafter, and these engines are of the right scale size (i.e., they are not underscale like the ones Airfix gives us).

      - DACO 737s are wonderfully faithful -- for 737-300s,-400s, and -500s. As stated above, they can be converted into 737-100s or -200s by cutting the fuselage down and administering some careful sanding to the dorsal fin. The lower wing, in particular, needs a lot of fussing and care. Attention to minuter detail will point out that a set of Airfix nosewheels will be needed and that the nosegear strut will need to be moved forward 0.6mm (Boeing moved the nose gear aft and made the nosewheels larger to give the -300 and later series' engines a tad mode ground clearance). OCD sufferers will also be kept awake at night by the need to cut back the outer wing chord ever so slightly. This is nothing compared to the severe pangs that would torture then once they discover that the model lacks the characteristic Boeing double-bubble "crease beam." Having gone the full distance converting DACO plastic, it would be churlish to deny the resulting model engines by Eastern Express.

      Enjoy!

      Author Message

      NX28388


      Upper Deck Member

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 499
      Location:
      Occupation: Professional overthinker
      Age:

      Post #69760, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      LH707 :
      Out of curiosity, what don't you like about resin?



      I was wondering the same thing. Kurt's is the only decent out-of-box -100 I know of and should be a painless build, with only the removal of pour plugs and some simple assembly. It's about a fifth of the work that will be involved in converting and correcting the Airfix kit. I know I normally say "make the most of what you have," but this is an instance where I would make the investment in the AA kit.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

      Author Message

      Jennings


      Contributors

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 3945
      Location: The great desert southwest, USA
      Occupation: Nurse Anesthetist
      Age: 116

      Post #69761, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      LH707 :
      high-pressure air under the wing reduced downforce on the gear leg and impeded braking



      Which is a nice way to say that the t/r's actually lifted the main wheels OFF the runway under some conditions. Basically a 737 wheelbarrow

      Author Message

      anj4de


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 19
      Location: Mittbach/Bavaria
      Occupation:
      Age: 55

      Post #69762, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks for the answers...

      Skippiebg...what do you mean with "Boeing double-bubble "crease beam", please? I am very new to Airliners and am only just beginning to get into the deeper levels of them.

      On Brit Modeller there is a build threat somewhere where a guy has put 4mm plugs into the Airfix engines and had beefed up the pylons. Would that mod make them scale or are they also to thin?




      What I do not like about resin...well, I really do not know exactly. I think it's wonderful for add on parts or cockpits in bigger scales but I somehow can not see me doing a whole model from it. I somehow like poly a lot more...the glue welds, if something goes wrong I break out Evergreens and poly plates and fix it, I can carve it very well and it does not stink when sanded. Not to mention the health issues with the dust. Poly is just what I am used to. This is of course the opinion of someone who has not yet done a resin model I have to admit. What I definitely can not see are LG legs in resin under a solid and hence heavy resin model in 1/144. The LG legs of the old Revell 747-100 that I takle right now already look rather flimsy but at least the plane itself is rather light. I am debating leaving it off and do an "in flight" display...

      cheers
      Uwe

      PS: Eventually I want the four Boeing Classics on my shelf...737, 727, 707 and 747. Being a child of the 60ties and 70ties that epoch attracts me more then the present time!

      Author Message

      anj4de


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 19
      Location: Mittbach/Bavaria
      Occupation:
      Age: 55

      Post #69763, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello again

      Being new on Airliners I am very curious and currently surf the web more then using the sanding sticks...
      Now on the 737 subject I just found this:
      http://bigplaneskits.com/shop/uncategorized/737-200-canadian-north/
      I am VERY VERY tempted now...and with the annual bonus payment coming up...
      Has anybody build this model already? It looks fantastic and even comes with the "grable kit" :-)

      cheers
      Uwe

      Author Message

      skippiebg


      Contributors

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 890
      Location: Sofia
      Occupation: interpreter and translator
      Age: 62

      Post #69764, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      anj4de :
      Thanks for the answers...

      Skippiebg...what do you mean with "Boeing double-bubble "crease beam", please? I am very new to Airliners and am only just beginning to get into the deeper levels of them.

      On Brit Modeller there is a build threat somewhere where a guy has put 4mm plugs into the Airfix engines and had beefed up the pylons. Would that mod make them scale or are they also to thin?




      1. The fuselages of Boeing single aisle aeroplanes (707 to 757) are made up of two intersecting circles. The points, either side of each fuselage, where they intersect, are dimples in cross-section and form a slight depression or "crease" each side which, measuring all of perhaps not more than 1 or 2 degrees, is faintly but undeniably visible at approximately the floor line. (Douglas DC-8 and DC-9 aeroplanes also have that feature and it is much more clearly marked, especially on the DC-9 family. So do Stratocruisers, Curtiss C-46 Commandoes, and Vickers Vanguards, inter alia.)

      2. I know the build thread you mean, and I greatly respect the author. Sadly, the thread no longer has viewable photos since Photobucket's infamous "suicide note" of a year ago. I have not measured the engines as done there, but they looked very good and just right. You correctly note the possible proportional dicrepancy between lenghtening them while leaving their diameter untouched. Frankly, that simply doesn't matter! What matters is never measured as, say, 0.2mm. What matters is the peace of your soul, the therapeutic reward you derive from your modelling, and just possibly the rather transient enjoyment you might grant your family members or the wider public when they view the finished thing.

      Author Message

      Jennings


      Contributors

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 3945
      Location: The great desert southwest, USA
      Occupation: Nurse Anesthetist
      Age: 116

      Post #69765, posted on 03-15-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Boeing narrow body jets have the "double-bubble" or "8" cross section. That dates back to the original Model 367-80, which without competition from Douglas, would have been a 5-abreast 707 with an oval cross section. Douglas announced that its (still on paper) DC-8 would have 6-abreast seating, forcing Boeing to re-design the 707 fuselage to accommodate it. They did that by widening the diameter of the upper fuselage above the floor beam, resulting in the "8" shape. Here's a front view of a 737 showing the "crease beam" (aka the "lobe crease"). It's visible in side view as well. Common to the 707, 727, 737, and 757 fuselages.


      Author Message

      dave6376


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 352
      Location: Perthshire, Scotland
      Occupation: Retired lawyer
      Age: 66

      Post #69767, posted on 03-16-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I don't want to divert you away from Airliner Cafe but Britmodeller has a current "group build" on the Boeing 737. All the models being worked on are 1/144 or 1/200 and nobody is doing the BPK kit but there is a lot of useful information about the Airfix and Daco kits in particular. The thread by Viking is the first time I've seen anyone tackle the early engines (as shown on D-ABEC above) and it's a masterclass in how to get the best out of the Airfix kit.

      http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/forum/616-boeing-737-stgb/

      Author Message

      nielsamd


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 145
      Location:
      Occupation:
      Age:

      Post #69768, posted on 03-16-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Lastly, the 100 and 200 have different WBFs, there's a sketch on here somewhere.

      Hmmm I have a Welsh (1/144) -100 vacform fuselage ostensibly bought for an Airfix conversion.
      I shall now have to check if Densil Wade gave it a different WBF.................

      Author Message

      Ben Brown


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 202
      Location: Raleigh, NC
      Occupation:
      Age:

      Post #69769, posted on 03-16-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I never noticed the Daco 737s lack the double lobe! Wow!

      I've converted three Daco -300s to -200s using Authentic Airliners engines. The list of mods I made is around here somewhere on the Airlinercafe forum. I'll post a couple of photos this weekend when I have more time, if anyone is interested. I think going this route takes a little less work and filler than it takes to clean up the Airfix kit. I still suspect the Airfix engine length might be based on the length of engines fitted with the original reversers. They do look much better when you add that 4 mm plug Viking suggested.

      Uwe, if you don't mind spending a little extra, consider giving the Authentic Airlners kits a try. If you've successfully battled the installation of a resin cockpit into a model, you will be pleasantly surprised how easily an AA kit goes together. They're certainly easier to build than the Airfix 737!

      Cheers!

      Ben

      Author Message

      anj4de


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 19
      Location: Mittbach/Bavaria
      Occupation:
      Age: 55

      Post #69771, posted on 03-16-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello again...

      Here you go...27days for a paint job! I'm affarid I am not much faster with my models...;-) Are decals available of that bird? :-)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hsd8-EESesI

      cheers
      Uwe

      Author Message

      NX28388


      Upper Deck Member

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 499
      Location:
      Occupation: Professional overthinker
      Age:

      Post #69772, posted on 03-16-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Ben Brown :
      Uwe, if you don't mind spending a little extra, consider giving the Authentic Airlners kits a try. If you've successfully battled the installation of a resin cockpit into a model, you will be pleasantly surprised how easily an AA kit goes together. They're certainly easier to build than the Airfix 737!



      Seriously, yes. I just had a look at the Authentic Airliners 737-100 on Kurt's website:

      https://www.authentic-airliners.de/epages/64205758.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/64205758/Products/K144-42

      The fuselage is already together; you just have to cut off the pour stub and attach the tail cone. Wings and tail surfaces are ready to install with one cut each to remove pour stubs. The pour stubs on the flap track fairings will probably detach by scoring with a sharp knife. The engine sections require minimal sawing and sanding. I've dealt with resin cockpits that generated a lot more resin dust than the average Authentic Airliners kit. Kurt also engineers his kits with the builder in mind, so there will be minimum cleanup and filling needed to get a good model.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

      Author Message

      LH707


      Upper Deck Member

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 1004
      Location:
      Occupation:
      Age:

      Post #69773, posted on 03-16-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      NX28388 :
      I know I normally say "make the most of what you have"



      I like that approach, which is why I try to avoid acquiring anything that's not an AA kit (though I'll do a Revell 748 at some point...)

      Quote
      anj4de :

      What I do not like about resin...well, I really do not know exactly. I think it's wonderful for add on parts or cockpits in bigger scales but I somehow can not see me doing a whole model from it. I somehow like poly a lot more...the glue welds, if something goes wrong I break out Evergreens and poly plates and fix it, I can carve it very well and it does not stink when sanded. Not to mention the health issues with the dust. Poly is just what I am used to. This is of course the opinion of someone who has not yet done a resin model I have to admit. What I definitely can not see are LG legs in resin under a solid and hence heavy resin model in 1/144. The LG legs of the old Revell 747-100 that I takle right now already look rather flimsy but at least the plane itself is rather light. I am debating leaving it off and do an "in flight" display...

      cheers
      Uwe

      PS: Eventually I want the four Boeing Classics on my shelf...737, 727, 707 and 747. Being a child of the 60ties and 70ties that epoch attracts me more then the present time!



      Uwe, I totally get it, I wasn't a fan of resin at first, mostly because it was "something different." My first AA kit was a bit of a learning experience, I ended up using medium CA for the classic "glue and mate" function, and the extra-thin CA to just put down a seam of pre-fit parts. In that regard, I now prefer resin, because if I fuck up, I can just put the parts in a bag of acetone and it won't dissolve anything except the bad bond.

      Regarding the sanding, I use plastic-backed paper and wet-sand, and I do my sawing outside. Really the only annoying thing about it is the molding bricks, that's easily dealt with using a dremel tool working outside.

      About the weight, most of Kurt's larger kits have metal gear, so it's all good.

      Ultimately, you gotta do whatever makes you happy, but I'd certainly recommend taking a swing with resin. I did, and have not looked back.

      Edit: WBF ref: http://airlinercafe.com/forums.php?m=posts&q=10191

      Author Message

      BruinPrideBand


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 493
      Location: SGF
      Occupation: International Aviation Law
      Age:

      Post #69774, posted on 03-16-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      I, too, had the same reservations about Resin prior to building one of the AA kits. I actually purchased the ERJ-145 kit (which is less expensive) to try it out. There is not a kit that is easier to build than the AA kits. Kurt (Designer, owner, creator of AA) has several build threads on this forum. I'm certain if you ran into any problems he'd be happy to assist.

      I'm with LH 707, most of the new kits I buy are from AA (which reminds me, the A340 is out!!). If you end up going that route you won't regret it.

      Chris

      "Sorry Goose... But it's time to buzz the Tower."

      Author Message

      radioguy


      Upper Deck Member

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 537
      Location: Montreal
      Occupation: Misplaced
      Age:

      Post #69775, posted on 03-16-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Uwe,

      Yes. Decals are available from our old Brasilian friend....if you can find them.
      I just checked both the Gio site and Guillem's eBay site, and neither show them
      in stock. Sheet is Gio Decals GD144-321. I believe Al Lees had them reprinted
      on his own decal stock. It's something to keep in mind if you do find a sheet.
      More recent product from this source seems to be printed on a rather thin film.
      Given the intricacy of this scheme, you might want to find a more robust stock.
      Keep in mind this is for a B737-800, a far cry from your original post.


      Quote
      anj4de :
      Hello again...

      Here you go...27days for a paint job! I'm affarid I am not much faster with my models...;-) Are decals available of that bird? :-)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hsd8-EESesI

      cheers
      Uwe


      Alan Aronoff
      CYUL

      Author Message

      LH707


      Upper Deck Member

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 1004
      Location:
      Occupation:
      Age:

      Post #69776, posted on 03-17-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      BruinPrideBand :
      I, too, had the same reservations about Resin prior to building one of the AA kits. I actually purchased the ERJ-145 kit (which is less expensive) to try it out. There is not a kit that is easier to build than the AA kits. Kurt (Designer, owner, creator of AA) has several build threads on this forum. I'm certain if you ran into any problems he'd be happy to assist.

      I'm with LH 707, most of the new kits I buy are from AA (which reminds me, the A340 is out!!). If you end up going that route you won't regret it.

      Chris



      I just saw the A340 availability too, and then had a pang of guilt that I'm a dork who has nothing better to do on a Friday night. To be fair, I need to go work on my IFR cert tomorrow, so raging hard isn't an option, but still....

      Author Message

      anj4de


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 19
      Location: Mittbach/Bavaria
      Occupation:
      Age: 55

      Post #69778, posted on 03-17-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Good Morning all...

      Thanka a lot to all for the in-depth answers. Highly appriciated...:-)
      Yesterday the Airfix kit I ordered arrived! I remember it from my child days but really did not remember that it was that small! Then looking at what some folks make out of it is even more amazing.

      Thanks a lot for explaining the double bubble...very interesting! I wonder if that 1/72 scale Russian 737 has it? I have also read that the 737, 727 and 707 all share the same basic fuselage layout? Does that mean that we could, for example, take the front of a good kit (Daco, Zvezda) and marry it to let'say an Airfix 707-400? The later ones can be found on E-bay for 10EUR over here. Same goes for the 727!

      If I find time the WE I will start making some cuts on that little Airfix bird.

      Thanks a lot
      Uwe

      PS: That -800 Salmon bird looks very nice! Not old school but cool! ;-) There are some very nice videos on Youtube from Alaska Air...

      Author Message

      skippiebg


      Contributors

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 890
      Location: Sofia
      Occupation: interpreter and translator
      Age: 62

      Post #69779, posted on 03-17-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      anj4de :
      the 737, 727 and 707 all share the same basic fuselage layout? Does that mean that we could, for example, take the front of a good kit (Daco, Zvezda) and marry it to let'say an Airfix 707-400?



      Sadly, no. The 707 and 720 are different in that its fuselage's lower lobe is larger (its radius is larger), The difference begins to be noticeable from somewhere below the middle of the flightdeck windows and grows aft of there. But you can transplant a Roden 720 or 720B nose to an Airfix 707 instead! The Roden kit has the right shape.

      The 727 forward fuselage is the same as that of the 737 and its aft fuselage is the same as that of the 707/720.

      The 757 fuselage (but not nose!) is like that of the 727 -- the same as the 737 forward, and the same as the 707/720 aft.

      If the cabin windows are of interest, Jennings will have something to add (I think to the general effect that those of the early 707s were smaller and all others until the 777 weer the same, or something like that, but that their pitch differs).

      Trust of help.

      Enjoy!

      Author Message

      dave6376


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 352
      Location: Perthshire, Scotland
      Occupation: Retired lawyer
      Age: 66

      Post #69782, posted on 03-17-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Ben Brown :
      I never noticed the Daco 737s lack the double lobe! Wow!

      ...

      Ben



      I don't like to disagree with Skippiebg but I'm working on a Daco 737-400 as I write this and I can assure you it does have the double lobe.

      Author Message

      anj4de


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 19
      Location: Mittbach/Bavaria
      Occupation:
      Age: 55

      Post #69783, posted on 03-17-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks...

      Skippiebg, I just had a look at what Roden has to offer...remember, new guy on Airliners ;-)...and some of their jets I think will find their way into my stash and hopefully onto the bench! The 720 series looks good especially the "Led Zeppelin" tour bird, would make a nice display together with "Ed Force One" :-)
      And then there is that box art that really caught my attention, the BOAC VC-10! It's been a long time since I was really pulled into a model by the picture on the box, this is one of them for sure.

      cheers
      Uwe

      Author Message

      skippiebg


      Contributors

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 890
      Location: Sofia
      Occupation: interpreter and translator
      Age: 62

      Post #69784, posted on 03-17-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      dave6376 :
      I don't like to disagree with Skippiebg but I'm working on a Daco 737-400 as I write this and I can assure you it does have the double lobe.



      But I love disagreement! Truth is born of it!

      What I wrote in my original post was that it lacked the crease beam, not the double lobe. A double lobe it indeed most assuredly has! What it lacks is the faint discontinuity, the flattish crease -- perhaps 1 or 2 degrees of arc, not much more -- where the two radii intersect. It is visible enough in differential light to invite inspection with a roving fingernail. Most kit makers do not show it. Those that do often exaggerate it offputtingly, like Airfix on their 727.

      Author Message

      Redbelliedjet


      Upper Deck Member

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 332
      Location: Over Macho Grande
      Occupation: International Man of Mystery
      Age: 45

      Post #69785, posted on 03-17-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello Uwe,

      Sorry I am a bit late to the ball, but welcome to AC!

      You were asking about the BPK 737 kit. I have built it twice and, if you want a big 737, this is the one. It is a short run kit, so definitely not a shake the box affair. I am not a rivet counter, but it certainly looks right, and it also includes the hardware for the Unimproved Field Kit. Fit is generally good, with the exception of the window strips, which will require a fair amount of filling and sanding. My favorite part of the kit are the engines, which feature photo etched stator vanes. Very good wheel well detail is also present.



      PW decals were by Draw Decal, and the windows are from www.authentic-airliner-decals.de. On this model, I used Kurt's 737-200 Improvement kit which featured more accurate stabilizers and nose cone, with seamless engine inlet cowls.


      These metal landing gears are available from Ernie Gee at G-Factor Models (gfactormodels@aol.com).






      This Aloha model was modified with scratch built flaps and slats, with decals from Mark Borer.

      As far as converting the DACO kit, the wing mods are not too difficult. The -300/-400/-500 (Classic Series) 737 wing differed from the -200 by adding 10 inch extensions to each wingtip, and the leading edge had a 4.4% chord extension, which could be eliminated with some careful sanding. Naturally, the fuselage will need to be cut down accordingly to get the correct length. As mentioned the dorsal fitting to the vertical stab will need to be removed, as will the tip extensions to the vertical and horizontal stabilizers. It would be a lot of work, but should turn out to be a nice model.

      I am actually looking to kit bash two BPK kits, using the Welsh Models engines and stabilizers to build the first 737-300 I ever flew in Southwest (Old) colors. It will be a project!

      I hope that helps, and if you need any specifics, feel free to email me.

      Cheers,

      Dan

      Dan Dornseif
      Redbelliedjet@airlinercafe.com
      "Hold on, we're goin' for broke!"
      -Joe Patroni

      Author Message

      Ben Brown


      Members

       Online status  

       
      Add As Buddy
      Posts: 202
      Location: Raleigh, NC
      Occupation:
      Age:

      Post #69792, posted on 03-18-2018 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      skippiebg :
      Quote
      dave6376 :
      I don't like to disagree with Skippiebg but I'm working on a Daco 737-400 as I write this and I can assure you it does have the double lobe.



      But I love disagreement! Truth is born of it!

      What I wrote in my original post was that it lacked the crease beam, not the double lobe. A double lobe it indeed most assuredly has! What it lacks is the faint discontinuity, the flattish crease -- perhaps 1 or 2 degrees of arc, not much more -- where the two radii intersect. It is visible enough in differential light to invite inspection with a roving fingernail. Most kit makers do not show it. Those that do often exaggerate it offputtingly, like Airfix on their 727.



      Ah, I see! Thanks!

      Ben