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      Oldflyer


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      Post #72651, posted on 06-10-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi everyone,
      Iím new here, just signed up the other day and wanted to say ďHiĒ and to ask a question. How do you paint the chrome/silver circle at the leading edge of an engine pod? I havenít worked on models for 55+ years and Iím just getting back into it. I use only acrylic paint due to the lack of adequate ventilation although I do have a paint booth setup in the garage. The models Iíve seen on here are fantastic and Iíd like to come close to what you guys have accomplished. Any help would be appreciated.

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      Challenger350Pilot


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      Post #72652, posted on 06-10-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi Oldflyer! Welcome to the forum! And glad you're getting back into modelling. I'm sure you'll find that after some patience and practice, you'll enjoy as much as you ever did before. Happy modelling!

      As to painting the anti ice inlets for your jets...there are probably as many opinions and techniques as there are modelers, so I'll share with you what I usually do, depending on the effect desired. I do not have any experience with the acrylics; what I share is strictly with the enamels. I use Alclad paints for my inlets, and these unique paints require tedious and detailed prep for the application to be shiny. I prepare the inlets by sanding smooth, to an almost shiny finish, then clean the area carefully with mild soap and water or a small dab of rubbing alcohol on a clean lint free cloth. Remember, the surface your painting needs to be as clean as you can make it...lint free, dust free, and scratch free. The shiny stuff, regardless of what you use, will always show any imperfections. After sanding and cleaning, I prime the surface either with a very bright gloss white, such as Tamiya TS-26, or the Alclad glossy black primer. Clean again. Then apply the paint, usually Alclad Airframe Aluminum or Chrome. The Alclad goes on bright and shiny, so there is very little polishing if any required. Depending on the model you are finishing, you may want a dull aluminum inlet, for which I use Alclad Duraluminum. To mask, I always use the Tamiya masking tape that is useful for curves. This comes in very small widths, which you may find easy to apply around the inlet. It stretches and bends, and goes around not-too-sharp curves quite easily and maintains its tack without leaving residue when its peeled off. When masking the entire engine behind the masked inlet, I just use household painters' blue tape or green frog tape...but don't leave it on too long...it definitely leaves a residue. Take a look at the link below at a build I posted here a few months ago; scroll down to take a look at the engine build. Hope this helps!

      Enjoy! Looking forward to seeing your work!

      https://www.airlinercafe.com/forums.php?m=posts&p=72084#72084

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      Oldflyer


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      Post #72653, posted on 06-10-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      Thank you Challenger...that is a very detailed description on how to do it. I will try it in acrylic first to see if I can develop the technique and if I do ok, then if I can improve my ventilation, try it the way you do it. BTW...I saw your pictures on another site and thought they were fantastic. I look at your end result as inspiration. Thank you again for taking the time to provide the ďhow-toĒ.

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      Post #72655, posted on 06-10-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      Oldflyer, welcome back to the hobby! I use a similar approach with the stretchy 3 mm tape, one thing I focus on is to have the seam on the underside of the nacelle, that way if there's a misalignment or mad matchup, it's more easily hidden. I used to use Alclad as well, but found it's adhesion not to be super good, so I switched to AK Interactive metalizer, which is an enamel that cures more solidly, and is more forgiving of paint prep errors. Another benefit of it is that you can tint it by mixing a drop of some other color in with the metalizer as needed.

      Regarding the smell, I've got an apartment without a garage, so I spray outside. That solves the smell problem.

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      Post #72656, posted on 06-10-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      Hey Oldflyer..it's about time you showed up! Welcome.

      To add one tip to the already well outlined technique(s), I'll explain..

      The Tamiya flex tape is extremely well suited for following the curves.
      Where you might run into an issue (albeit a small one) is where the tape
      overlaps itself. That ridge needs to be very well sealed to avoid a bleed.
      The rather low tack properties of the tape don't necessarily bode well for
      maintaining that seal throughout the painting process. To avoid this, I place
      a small piece of Tamiya paper masking tape along the edge. Just long enough
      to act as the meeting point of the flex tape. True, you're now dealing with 2
      potential bleed points. But because the paper tape is much thinner, the seal
      is more apt to be better. If there is any bleed, you can usually scrape it away
      with a #11 blade.

      Alan Aronoff
      CYUL

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      Jennings


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      Post #72657, posted on 06-10-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      Welcome back to the hobby! Be aware that most engine inlet leading edges arenít at all shiny, and in fact, on most modern aircraft they are almost a dead flat finish. Take a look next time you fly someplace.

      Lots of thin strips of masking tape is the trick!

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      Post #72659, posted on 06-10-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      For intricate masking I cut thin strips of Tamiya tape - for instance, I'll slice a 6 mm width of tape into three 2 mm strips or four 1.5 mm strips, and that lets me get really good curves and bends on the border I want to mask. Then I'll mask the remainder with full-width strips.

      I keep a piece of glass in an old picture frame near my workbench, and slice the tape into strips with a new #11 blade guided by a metal straight-edge. I've used this technique for a long time and it's yet to let me down.

      I have the Tamiya tape that's made for bends and curves, and it's good stuff, but I haven't used it very much - at least, not enough for me to render an informed verdict, although I know the people who have used it really seem to like it.

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      gjake


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      Post #72661, posted on 06-11-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      Oldflyer, here's the method I like to use. Use an engraved panel line if there is one, or, gently run a #11 blade along a raised panel line to create a recessed line to define the intake lip. When ready, you can use the panel line to guide the placement of your tape, or, you can actually cover the panel line with tape (you can use regular frosted scotch tape for this), then cut through the tape with your #11 blade using the panel line to guide the knife, thus exposing the intake lip to be painted.

      Gene
      MOB

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      Oldflyer


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      Post #72663, posted on 06-11-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      I would like to thank all of you for responding. These are great ideas and techniques and I am certainly going to try them. Thanks again.