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      cesare747


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      Post #73725, posted on 11-03-2019 GMT-5 hours    
      Great new items from our friend Kurt, Comets and early 707-120, short and tall tails coming up !

      All the best,
      Cesar
      MIA

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      waltmertins


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      Post #74642, posted on 03-08-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      I just received my Authentic Airliners Birthday Order.
      Lots of kits, Caravelles, Tridents, 747's and 767's.
      But my highlight was the 707-120 non globe wing.
      Boy o boy have I been waiting for this kit. I built many Revell 707 but I got tired of the sanding.
      Yes I know there is a pro AA and anti AA group in this forum but....
      If I have to work hard on a cheap kit to turn it into a nice kit,I much rather pay a little extra and build a masterpiece.
      Yes, I am in the pro AA models, they are awesome and well worth the price.
      Anyhow, check these incredible non-globe wings and the super nice short tail.
      Add some super awesome Vintage Flyer decals and yup awesome 707-120

      I also got some some JT4A engines but not too sure if they are going to work to do a 707-220.
      Were all JT4A engine cowlings the same size?
      Or did Braniff had extra large cowlings for their JT4A engines?

      Walter

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      mark m


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      Post #74643, posted on 03-09-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi Walter,

      I also got the JT4A's to do a 707-227 with one of my 707 kits. I have not started that one yet, but I think they look really good to do a -227. I compared an AA 707-331 I have already done with the 707-120 I just finished and there is a noticeable difference that you would expect to see. I am an Authentic Airliners fan as well with 44 kits to date. 15 of those are 707 kits. I just saw that Kurt is releasing a A340-200 soon. I am glad I haven't started carving up a revell A340-300 yet.

      I got hooked by the 707 &757 kits. The Minicraft Kits were pretty aggravating once you battled through fixing everything and the fixes end up being about the same as the AA Kit.



      Good luck!

      Mark

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      Chernoff


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      Post #74645, posted on 03-09-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Don't confuse pictures of BN 707-227 and 720-027 when looking at the engines. The -220 used the JT-4a, had larger cowls, and a TC inlet on all four. The 720 (picture in your post) had the smaller JT-3c and TC inlets on only the inboard engines as on ALL B720 series. Looking forward to seeing your finished projects.

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      waltmertins


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      Post #74646, posted on 03-09-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Good eye "Chernoff"!!
      I just happen to have the book on my desk and used it to take the pictures.
      The front cover picture of the book is a 720 not a 707.

      I used the George Cearley book to confirm that the JT4A's on the 707-220 were exactly the same as the JT4A's on the 707-320 Intercontinental.
      4 turbo compressors
      amazing detail on the JT4's "organ pipes" and "daisy head"

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #74654, posted on 03-11-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings!

      Although it is not important for the correct look, note that the T/C doghouse on the #1 engine of all JT3C or JT4A powered 707 airplanes is fake, and on many short 707's, but not all, the #4 is as well. There is no T/C actually installed above #1 (AFAIK) on any of them. The 707 typically had 4 low pressure bleed switches and a maximum of no more than 3 T/C installations. In a descent, you needed all 4 LPBS's and all of your T/C's on and the 2 inboard engines well above idle, or the cabin would climb even though you needed it to descend to field elevation. This was true even at only 4-5,000 feet ASL. The DC-8 never had this problem, and once you were down to 31,000 feet or so, all throttles could be closed and the cabin would continue descending to field elevation just fine. The DC-8 was a much tighter airplane. United had their Flight Engineers shut off all but 1 T/C (the DC-8 had 4) in cruise to save fuel, and 1 T/C could easily handle the load in cruise. That is plenty of redundancy, eh? (Practicing my Canadian Speak, eh?)

      Regards,
      Jeff Jarvis

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Chernoff


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      Post #74655, posted on 03-11-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      JJ is 100% correct. He is an expert on differences.

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      waltmertins


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      Post #74667, posted on 03-12-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Jeff I was not aware that the number one pylon was fake.
      But now it makes sense why everywhere I read about the 220 says that the number one engine had no turbo-compressor.
      But then again, all pictures show TC intakes.
      Now I know.

      Walter

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      AAMD11


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      Post #74681, posted on 03-14-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      All these years loving the 707 family and did not know this.
      Thanks Jeff




      Jerry

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #74685, posted on 03-15-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Chernoff :
      JJ is 100% correct. He is an expert on differences.



      Greetings!

      WHOOOOA!!!! Don't hang that "EXPERT" moniker on me! You know my thoughts on that....a little bit of knowledge is oftentimes dangerous, which is about where I am on most things. The more I learn about something, the more aware I become of how much more there is to know that I don't know. Your accolade is very flattering, but I am certainly not deserving of it! Thanks for the thought, though. Enough said.

      When it comes to the 707, a look at the flight engineers panel tells you all you need to know. Assuming of course, that said airplane is available and has not been scrapped. Anyway, if you can look at the F/E panel, you'll see the T/C switches. If you see 3 of them, then there are T/C installations on 2, 3, and 4. If you only see 2, then the T/C's will be on 2 and 3. And then, there could be a fly in the ointment. N895PA was JET CLIPPER HERALD OF THE MORNING, a 707-321B Advanced delivered in late 1969. I rode on her in January, 1970 and she had 3 T/C's installed. In the late 1970's I saw her again taxiing for T/O on 09R in MIA, now missing the T/C hump on engine 4, and still a passenger airplane. Had I been able to see the F/E panel, I know that the switch for that T/C would have still been there, but with a DEACTIVATED sticker affixed next to it. Later on, with an engine change, she might have been back to having that T/C installed. If you think that all big 707's had 3 T/C's, no, American bought both -323B and -323C airplanes with only 2 T/C's installed, and there were others. Also, some small 707's had 3 installed. TWA had some overwater -131B models with 3 T/C's, and Pan American and QANTAS had 3 T/C's on all of their small ones. When looking at the engine from the left side, you will notice a hole for the T/C exhaust just above the cowling. If that hole is missing, it's a fake, and it is missing on the #1 engine pylon all of the time. Okay, so now you ask "Why the fake ones on the non turbofan airplanes, but the B and C models do not have the fakes?" I do not know for sure, but my guess is that not having them, while making a sort of unbalanced look, results in a lighter assembly thus saving fuel. Another possibility is that for ease and simplicity of manufacture, the early nonfan models had the same pylon pieces for all of the pylons, but some just had no T/C installed. It may be just that simple, but I really do not know for sure.

      When you look at the military C/KC-135 series airplanes converted to the fan engines from scrapped civil 707 airframes, you could see the T/C installations on any combination of engines up to and including all 4 engines. Since the -135 has no F/E panel, I have no idea where those switches would have been added.

      Without a doubt, the 707 and, to some extent, the DC-8, are 2 airplanes which were so custom made for the customer that you are sticking out your neck somewhat to talk in absolutes, so I am pretty careful in saying anything absolute about them. Another tidbit for you... The South African Airways 707-344 JT4A powered airplanes, of which there were 3 I believe (?), had full span leading edge flaps similar in configuration to those on the 720, i.e., they were not the big L/E flaps like the -320B and -320C had. Since there were so few of those built, and only for SAA, I have never been able to find any info on T/O or approach speed differences. I have only seen one photo (and in color) showing one taxiing at Heathrow with the LED's extended.

      Best regards,
      Jeff Jarvis

      PS:After writing this, I went and Googled South African Airways 707-344, images. I found 2 more photos of the airplane with LE flaps extended. Perhaps there are more. The normal fit of the older turbojet powered -120, -220, -320 and -420 airplanes is 2 pieces of leading edge flap on the inboard side of #1 and #4 engines, and the reason SAA bought their -344 airplanes with the extra LED's fitted was for improved performance necessary to carry good payloads out of hot and high Johannesburg. Note that the -120 airplanes that were converted to B engines all had the modified wing leading edges fitted with the glove and full span LED's like the -120B and 720 had.

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #74691, posted on 03-16-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      waltmertins :
      I just received my Authentic Airliners Birthday Order.
      Lots of kits, Caravelles, Tridents, 747's and 767's.
      But my highlight was the 707-120 non globe wing.
      Boy o boy have I been waiting for this kit. I built many Revell 707 but I got tired of the sanding.
      Yes I know there is a pro AA and anti AA group in this forum but....
      If I have to work hard on a cheap kit to turn it into a nice kit,I much rather pay a little extra and build a masterpiece.
      Yes, I am in the pro AA models, they are awesome and well worth the price.
      Anyhow, check these incredible non-globe wings and the super nice short tail.
      Add some super awesome Vintage Flyer decals and yup awesome 707-120

      I also got some some JT4A engines but not too sure if they are going to work to do a 707-220.
      Were all JT4A engine cowlings the same size?
      Or did Braniff had extra large cowlings for their JT4A engines?

      Walter




      Hello Walter,

      If the JT4A engines are 1/144 scale, they are correct for any and all -227 or -320 models of 707 in 1/144. JT4A-3, -9, -11 or -12 engines all had the same pod and sound suppressor regardless of the thrust rating. One size fits all, and these were a dry engine, no water injection, ever.

      As you said, the -227 wing is of the 707-120 variety with no glove on it, and boy, do I want to see the finished model!

      My first ride on a 707 (my second ride on a jet) was on a red, white and blue Braniff 707-227 from Tocumen Airport in Panama to Miami in early June, 1965. I still remember it, along with the purser coming around spraying a bug bomb as we were in our descent to land in MIA. That was required on all flights into the USA in those days by the US Dept of Agriculture.

      BTW, who makes those JT4A engines? I could use a few sets of those! They look very good.

      Good luck, and I hope this helps Walter.

      Best regards,
      Jeff

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Post #74692, posted on 03-16-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks Jeff,
      The JT4A engines come from Authentic Airliners 707-320 kit.

      https://www.authentic-airliners.de/epages/64205758.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/64205758/Products/K144-41

      I am going to figure out how to go about the engine pylon since the 707-320 and the 707-220 engines mounted
      differently on the wing.

      Walter

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #74693, posted on 03-16-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello Walter!

      Are you saying they mounted differently on the wing of the real ones or on the kit? The real ones should be pretty close if not the same. The length of the sailboat fairing is either the same or darn close on a -220 VS a -320. I have never measured them on the real airplanes (lack of access), but the shapes and curves appear to be the same.

      Of course, this would not be the first time someone pointed out something to me I had never noticed before!

      Regards,
      Jeff

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      gjake


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      Post #74694, posted on 03-16-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Walter, if you have an Airfix 707 kit, look at those engines as possible doner pylons.

      Gene
      MOB

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      mark m


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      Post #74695, posted on 03-16-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings,

      The AA 707-320B/C & 720 engines attache under the wing. The 707-320/420 are slotted through the wing. The 707-120/120B engines fit around the wing. All of them are accurate but different. I assume that Kurt found better ways to do it as he produced the various versions more or less in that order. So to make a 707-227, the wing is designed to take the engines that fit around the wing. To use the JT4A Engines that came with the 707-320 kit, you have to cut a slot where the engine goes to mount it on the 707-120 wing to get a 707-227. Boeing only built 5 707-227's and crashed the first one before Braniff could take delivery of it. That would be a lot of re-engineering for Kurt to adapt the JT4A to his 707-120 kit for a very small market inside a very small market so we must do it. It doesn't really look all that hard. I am finishing up a AA 767-200 (U.S. Air) and the Braniff 707-227 Jet will be next.

      Good luck,

      Mark

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      waltmertins


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      Post #74696, posted on 03-16-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      The scale model!
      There is a different method of attaching the engines to the wing on the Authentic Airliners 1/144 707's.
      Same result though!



      Aren't those engines simple awesome?

      Gene, funny you said that. I do have an Airfix 707 but after digging in the closet for it, I cant find it.
      Mind you, I found a lot of cool stuff and managed to waste all afternoon, but I had a blast!

      Walter

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #74697, posted on 03-16-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello Walter!

      I thought it likely you were talking about the kit, just wasn't sure. I think Mark covered it pretty thoroughly in his post, so good luck with it and I'll be looking forward to seeing it when you finish your build.

      Mark, the 707-227 crash up in Washington state is discussed at length in the book "Growing Up Boeing" written by Lew Wallick's daughter Rebecca Wallick. Lew was a Boeing test pilot, noted for leading the 727 test program, but working on many different airplane test programs during a long career at Boeing. This is a book most of you would enjoy reading, and the crash is discussed starting on page 104 in this book, which I highly recommend to all. Get it soon while it is still in print and available cheaply in large print paperback. I guarantee that you will find the anecdotes fascinating as well as revealing about the way Boeing used to do things before the recent fiasco.

      Regards,
      Jeff Jarvis

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Post #74736, posted on 03-21-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      No intention to drift to far from subject,
      but thanks Jeff, what an incredible book.
      I got it a couple of days ago and can not put it down.
      I had no clue that the rolling 707 famous picture was upside down.
      Highly recommended!!!

      Walter

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      Post #74739, posted on 03-21-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Hello Walter,

      I'm glad you are enjoying that book! It is one of the best nonfiction history books I have ever read that deals with intrigues formerly known only to insiders. Granted, Rebecca is very, VERY proud of her father, but then she should be! He and many other Boeing test pilots made incredible contributions to the success of the various airplane programs, oftentimes at great risk to their lives. It is thanks to them that many of the airplanes had design changes made that made them safer when they entered regular service.

      What am I talking about? Read the book like Walter is and find out!

      Regarding the rolling 367-80, yes, if you look, the ground appears to be above the wing, a dead giveaway! Tex did it twice that day over the lake.

      The Braniff 707-227 in the old "Pepsi Cola" red, white and blue is a favorite of mine, and I built one from a Revell 707-123B kit when I was in college at ERAU. I bought the decals from a guy in Texas named Tommy Salas. The engines were taken from an Airfix 707-420 kit and highly worked on with the chin scoop added and suppresors modified. I researched quite a bit to paint the wing correctly, and Boeing did not paint the whole wing in those days, the different hues being the metal color. It turned out okay for the timeframe in which I built it, but it is not up to the standards of today. I think it is somewhere in Florida in a slightly broken condition! I built it in 1973, so it is getting old and yellowed, and it is pretty much a relic of my youth.

      Best regards,
      Jeff

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Sparky


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      Post #74743, posted on 03-22-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Wonder what happened to Tommy Salas.
      Sparky

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      Post #74744, posted on 03-22-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Incredible book indeed Jeff. This could not be a better time to read a book!! ;)
      My Braniff 707-227 belongs now to the "1940 Air Terminal" Houston Hobby Museum. Please visit when you guys are in Houston. It is awesome!!
      I sanded down the revell 707 kit, added some Minicraft 707-320 modified engines with a resin
      nose from a 737 kit. It took me forever to finish the kit. I think three years. Decal from "Flying Colors", thanks Ahmend!
      I have to confess, I try to visit the museum once a year just to go see her! She is not perfect but...
      So now I am trying to do it all over again!
      There is something about that Braniff 227 that does it for me!

      Walter

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #74758, posted on 03-23-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings to all!

      Walter, did you live in Guatemala at one time? I am not sure why, but for some reason, I thought you did. Anyway, the Braniff 707-227 also was a great favorite of mine. I thought the red white and blue scheme was one of the sharpest ever to adorn a 707 or 720, and at first, I thought the solid jellybean scheme was the product of a demented mind. I soon grew to like it though! I guess I'm demented too, but I don't think I have dementia......

      Sparky, I too wonder what became of Tommy Salas, but I do not know. I heard somewhere from a source I don't remember that he had passed away several years ago. I never met him, but I liked his decals!

      Not wanting to hijack this thread, let's get back to the original subject that Cesare started with. I have resisted buying any of Kurt's kits because I'm so used to the idea that models are plastic with some occasional parts being made of resin, but it seems that nobody has had any major problems with parts not holding up or being undersized because of shrinkage, or any serious warpage. These kits do look very accurate from what I have seen, so I might have to reconsider my resistance. Obviously, due to limitations on Kurt's time and the difficulties in how many can be turned out to meet demand plus the necessarily high price, most of you have not bought huge numbers of them, but I was surprised to see that Mark has 44 of them! The guys who know me know that I don't normally add kits to my stash in single digit numbers, but I doubt that I'll ever buy 44 of them! The 707-120 kit with the -320 kit's JT4A engines substituted for the little JT3C-6 engines will make a neat 707-227, and I hope to see it when Walter finishes the model.

      Stay healthy and try to keep a sense of humor!

      Regards,
      Jeff Jarvis

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      electraglider


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      Post #74762, posted on 03-23-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Although I'm happy to see such an in depth discussion on variants of 87 year old airliner and has been enlightening on many aspects of 707 powered nacelles I have a question on the -400 model with the RR Conway bypass engine. As the Conway was an internal bypass rather than a P&W fan type nacelle. Is the the Conway nacelle bigger yet than the JT4 cowling or has it a center core engine the same as dia than the JT3, but with the bypass air ducts raise it to a JT4's size? I don't have the Frog 707-400 kit to compare sizes as at that time it was one of their first airliners not released in 1/96th scale. This engine is available in a photo viewable format , but like the DC-8-40 series, Conway nacelle size is rarely shown in drawings as the 2 P&W engines are to each other are. So my question is where in size was the Conway nacelle verses the P&W JT3 or JT4 or larger yet? A second question might also be why was the Conway so rarely optioned as a power plant yet went on to power the Victor for years afterward?

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #74764, posted on 03-23-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings!

      The diameter of the Conway 12 Mark 508 engine is 42 inches and it is just over 132 inches long without the jet pipe. The JT4A engine is 43 inches in diameter and it is just over 144 inches long, jet pipe or not was not specified in my reference data. They are quite similar in size and thrust, but I can't tell you anything regarding the core size of the Conway VS the JT3C or the JT4A. The problem is that there were far fewer Conway powered 707/DC-8 airplanes, and they were the only airplanes fitted with that model of Conway. The VC10, Super VC10 and Victor were all powered by engines of the same name, but much greater size and thrust. The 707 and DC-8 pods were pretty close in size whether the Conway or the JT4A were fitted, but they were not interchangeable for many detail reasons.

      As you alluded to, the Conway was a bypass engine, but it was not a turbofan. The bypass air was bled off of the diffuser case, unlike a turbofan in which the fan section is a much larger diameter than the N1 compressor section. A turbofan is also a bypass engine, but a bypass engine is not necessarily a turbofan.

      Do not use the Frog 707 kit to compare anything to anything. It is hardly a 707 by any stretch!

      The Victor was British, the Conway was British, the user of both the airplane and the engine was British. It made a big difference to Her Majesty's Treasury.... Nowadays, not so much. But, that was then, and the country was still recovering economically from a terrible war. Britain was, quite literally, bankrupt because of the cost of winning WWII and the people suffered badly, including with rationing until 1955. Buy British at all cost was the rule, and it made sense. It took years for Britain to get back on her feet, so anytime they needed a new airplane, they built it and powered it with a British engine if at all possible.

      Regards,
      Jeff Jarvis

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Post #74765, posted on 03-23-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      To pile on Jeff's point, the reason the Conway didn't sell is that it didn't provide all that much of an efficiency benefit over the JT4A because of the HPC takeoff and .3 BPR, as opposed to the 1.3 BPR of the JT3D. RR announced the Conway in 1955, and in 1956 someone asked a Pratt sales rep if they also had one in the pipe, to which the rep responded "Of course, I just need to get the specifics from my tech team." That rep went back and told them they needed a bypass engine, and the team actually managed to get something together by strapping a fan on the front of a JT3C and adding an LPT stage. This quick change got them 13% extra efficiency over the JT3C or JT4A (basically a scaled-up JT3C), which leapfrogged the 7% that RR was promising. That's why they only sold so few of the Conways, it was in that narrow window between around 55-57 before the world knew how good the JT3D was going to be. AI, LH, and BOAC eventually switched to the Pratt.

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      Post #74770, posted on 03-24-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Thanks Jeff,
      I knew the Conway was a breakthrough idea back then, but the bypass flow ratio improvement of the P&W rarely got printed in "Flight" or "Aeroplane"magazines ("Aviation Week" subscription was a no-no unless in the business). That it was so low verses the P&W turbofans has been also long forgotten by myself, Most of all thanks for the rough idea on the dim's of it to P&W engine pods. If 707-JT3's straight pipes are now long forgotten the 707-Conway in pods are only a footnote in 707 history.

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      mark m


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      Post #74772, posted on 03-24-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Well,

      It is an Authentic Airliners thread so it would be OK I think to point out the the AA 707-420 kit is awesome and available. By the time you kit bash a revell or minicraft kit with the Contrails Engines of dubious quality, if you can find them, you end up at around the same price point of the AA Kit.

      https://www.authentic-airliners.de/epages/64205758.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/64205758/Products/K144-44

      Mine is going to be a BA Landors Livery when it grows up!

      Good luck,

      Mark

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      Post #74773, posted on 03-24-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      "Mine is going to be a BA Landors Livery when it grows up!"

      Hi Mark,

      BA never flew the 707 in Landor livery, do you mean Negus? Or is it a What If!?

      Cheers,
      Ian

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      Post #74774, posted on 03-24-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Ahhhh..........

      You are quite correct sir. The Negus British Air Tours Livery. I think that is right.......

      Thanks,

      Mark

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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #74788, posted on 03-27-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings!

      One more thing........ Try to remember that regardless of which engine is hung, or how many T/C units there are, or how many are fake.... ALL 707/720 engine pods are hung so as to have the pylon be perpendicular to the dihedral of the wing. This was done so there would not be a drag or airflow interference problem of any kind with the installation. Aerodynamically, 90 degree angles are considered freebies. This is why the F4U Corsair had a gull wing perfectly 90 degrees to its fuselage attachment. Since the Corsair needed the wing to droop below the fuselage so the landing gear would give the prop adequate ground clearance, Vought was able to kill two birds with one stone. To see this pylon mounting on the 707 just look at head on photos.

      The 707 pylon wraps up over the leading edge of the wing and goes straight back. The DC-8-61 (and earlier DC-8 models) pylon hangs roughly straight up and down and it wraps over the leading edge and curves inward to the rear, and the CV-880 pylon is similar to the DC-8.

      Best regards,
      Jeff Jarvis

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Post #74823, posted on 04-01-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi everyone,

      I have noticed that the JT3 and JT4's have an almost "square with rounded corners" look to them. They appear to have flatter sides as opposed to the Conway which has a more "barrel" shaped nacelle.

      I have a head on shot of a line of UA B720's that shows what I am talking about...but I can't upload the picture.

      Am I imagining this?

      Braniff2
      MCI

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      Post #74869, posted on 04-04-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      My first attempt at a 707-227 Braniff at the "1940 Air Terminal Museum".
      Revell kit, Daco nose, Minicraft engines and awesome Flying Colors Decals.
      Behind the glass looks fantastic!!!
      Bad picture!
      Walter

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      Post #74885, posted on 04-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Braniff2 :
      Hi everyone,

      I have noticed that the JT3 and JT4's have an almost "square with rounded corners" look to them. They appear to have flatter sides as opposed to the Conway which has a more "barrel" shaped nacelle.

      I have a head on shot of a line of UA B720's that shows what I am talking about...but I can't upload the picture.

      Am I imagining this?

      Braniff2
      MCI



      Greetings!

      You are not imagining it. The Pratt cowlings just are not quite as round on the sides because the upper edges have a tighter radius, and the chin scoop on the Pratts helps create an illusion of accentuated squareness when looking head on. The Rolls is round all the way from front to rear on the sides and bottom and there is no chin scoop. All in all, the Conway pod looks very sleek, eh? (I just have to keep practicing my Canadian Speak until I get it right, eh?)

      Regards,
      Jeff

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Post #74930, posted on 04-09-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Hi Jeff!

      AH!!...thank you for confirming that I am not crazy...or hallucinating!

      When flying on the 707 series as a kid (back when the 707 was the "new" thing)...walking out to them (jetways?...not at most airports then)...I would look at those pods and swear they looked flat sided...but most models (except Revell) always had them as rounded.

      Thank you for clearing this up for me...and I agree...the Conway nacelle's always looked sleeker.

      Braniff2
      MCI

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      Post #74964, posted on 04-12-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings,

      Kurt released the 1/144 A340-200 Kit. Grab them while they last!

      https://www.authentic-airliners.de/epages/64205758.sf/sec81b8b8e97b/?ObjectPath=/Shops/64205758/Products/K144-70

      Mine is going to be a Philippine Air A340-200 when it grows up......

      Mark

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      Post #75012, posted on 04-14-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Tempting.... I was looking at that too, would need to think of the right scheme to do it in.

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      Post #75021, posted on 04-14-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      It is tough to find decals for an A340-200. You have to use A340-300 to get the liveries which is why I got the AA A340-200 Window set decals as well. Decals with the windows and the livery combined become problematic since the window count is different from the -300.

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      Post #75044, posted on 04-15-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Mark, thanks for the heads up, I'll keep an eye open for those. IIRC the shrink was just behind door 2 (4 windows in the first segment vs 8) and between doors 3 and 4, so unless it's a swoopy scheme like maybe Air Tahiti Nui, it shouldn't be too difficult to shorten, no?