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      Aeyb701


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      Post #74404, posted on 02-04-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Has anyone ever done this in 1/144?
      I googled it with different terms and no luck.
      Was thinking of it as a project, though seems a somber one. Maybe too somber for others to have done.
      I have a Minicraft 757 with nose and tail correction pieces from an ebayer in Mexico. Was going to do it in FedEx’s Canadian contractor Morningstar’s scheme but then I thought of this.
      Thanks.
      -Jon Archibald
      near CYYZ

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      Jennings


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      Post #74405, posted on 02-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Seems kind of creepy to me.

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      airlinerart1


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      Post #74406, posted on 02-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      Jennings :
      Seems kind of creepy to me.



      Agree, some things are just too sensitive and no matter how you present it, just seems disrespectful.

      Probably not a good idea.

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      DanaK


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      Post #74409, posted on 02-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Well, you don't have to tell anybody what they represent. I once considered making a representative model of a DC-4, whose crash site I had visited, and was going to display it with a small shard of the actual plane's structure. This might have been problematic, however, since it's possible that having the shard in my possession was a felony! Thankfully, I lost interest in the project...


      -Dana

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      waltmertins


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      Post #74410, posted on 02-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      The beauty of modeling is that you build what you want as you want it!
      Better to model than just talk about it!!

      Walter

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      skyking918


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      Post #74414, posted on 02-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      As a tribute to the crew and passengers I supposed it's a valid idea, but I don't know whether I would do it or not.

      Michael McMurtrey
      IPMS-USA #1746
      IPMS-Canada #1426
      Carrollton, Texas

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      NX28388


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      Post #74416, posted on 02-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Not that my opinion matters, but the aircraft as they were in service wouldn't be such a big thing. Each aircraft had a service life before the hijackings, and to be honest unless you knew the specific registrations those aircraft were identical to any of their respective fleetmates. Plus, it's not like "aircraft involved in tragedies" is anything new, any more than people think there's anything unusual about building a model of an ocean liner whose maiden-voyage sinking killed more than 1,500 people (or the never-ending stream of new kits of said ship).

      Where I draw the line is depicting the moments themselves. Many years ago I remember someone posting a picture from a model show of a diorama showing the back end of an American 767 sticking out of a flaming World Trade Center. Even if it was meant in earnest, it still struck me as being in exceedingly poor taste.

      Jodie Peeler

      "In any dispute the intensity of feeling is inversely proportional to the value of the issues at stake." - Sayre's Law

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      planecrazy


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      Post #74417, posted on 02-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      I think if someone built a model of the World Trade Center towers and included an American 757 moments before impact, that would define creepy/disrespectful. Otoh, a model of said aircraft is not, imho. I have thought of remembering those lost on PSA 182 or AA 191 with models using the those registrations. I recently built N736PA, the 747 used on Pan Americans' inaugural January 1970 London service. Coincidently, 736 was lost seven years later at Tenerife. So, by default, I have one such aircraft in my collection.

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      planecrazy


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      Post #74418, posted on 02-05-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      767 not 757

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      Laurent


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      Post #74420, posted on 02-06-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      War planes are just as creepy. Still, they are very popular among modellers.

      Laurent

      So many planes, so little time ...

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      NX28388


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      Post #74421, posted on 02-06-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      N736PA had a busy life before Tenerife and as one of Pan Am's first 747s (and as one of the earliest 747s) achieved an important "first" or two in its brief life, so there's an easy argument to make that modeling an accident aircraft isn't necessarily a morbid thing. Same goes for building a model of the Boeing 314 Yankee Clipper, which has been done many times over, even though that airplane's life ended in a crash that killed a lot of people, or the P-51 racer "Beguine," which met its demise in a horrifying and deadly crash. The Concorde F-BTSC involved in the fatal crash wore a couple of interesting paint schemes before spending the rest of its career in standard Air France colors, and I've built the Revell kit to depict F-BTSC in the beautiful old Air France colors.

      For that matter, even if I concentrate on aircraft I've personally flown aboard, I run the risk of building an accident aircraft. Many years ago I had a memorable flight aboard a Twin Otter. That aircraft was sold a couple years later, exported to Indonesia, and one day it slammed into the side of a mountain and everybody on board was killed. I wonder how many of us, especially those who haven't kept records of the registrations of the aircraft they've flown aboard, have flown aboard aircraft that later made headlines for the saddest reasons.

      To me there's nothing wrong with depicting an accident aircraft as it was in life. But when you, say, depict a PSA 727 with a Cessna snarled against its belly (or about to do so), and it's outside the context of aviation safety training, then we've crossed a threshold.

      Jodie Peeler

      "In any dispute the intensity of feeling is inversely proportional to the value of the issues at stake." - Sayre's Law

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      planecrazy


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      Post #74422, posted on 02-06-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Good points and I certainly agree with your last paragraph.

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      Laurent


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      Post #74423, posted on 02-06-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      Quote
      NX28388 :
      The Concorde F-BTSC involved in the fatal crash wore a couple of interesting paint schemes before spending the rest of its career in standard Air France colors, and I've built the Revell kit to depict F-BTSC in the beautiful old Air France colors.
      [...]
      I wonder how many of us, especially those who haven't kept records of the registrations of the aircraft they've flown aboard, have flown aboard aircraft that later made headlines for the saddest reasons.


      Hi Jodie,

      I flew aboard F-BTSC on a loop over the Atlantic just a few months before she crashed. I even took a picture of the area where the tragedy would unfold, still visible here: https://www.airliners.net/photo/Air-France/Aerospatiale-BAC-Concorde-101/99601 It came as a shock when I heard the news and found out it was that particular airframe.

      Laurent

      So many planes, so little time ...

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      electraglider


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      Post #74425, posted on 02-06-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      I get the feeling your saying building the aircraft as a group before the crash occurred just sitting on a base. If so, I also seen no problem with the model theme. It would be if it were 4 dioramas of the 4 airplanes at the time of the 4 crashes occurring that would be a downer. I have a model of " Beguine". Few if any know what that aircraft history was except why does the Mustang have a staff of music along the side? To many it will be after reading the large text card on the base defining that they are examples of the types of aircraft in the markings prior to the crash on that day. Can even more than a few of us immediately know what that group of planes represent with just a quick scan at the models without reading a card on the display board?

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      Berlin_Uwe


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      Post #74432, posted on 02-07-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      So many guys are building the airframes of WWII that brought the bombs to the cities. The german ones as well as the allied ones.
      For example the planes that brought the bombs to Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
      Hm.

      I am still fighting with myself: I like the passenger planes of the 30th/40th. But in Germany that means they often wore a swastika, a symbol which is still forbitten to use in Germany except for special, historic reasons. And I think that is right that way.
      But does that means: I can´t ever build an airliner of this epoch if I would like to build it correct. Or?

      As someone said: Build what you want as you want it. The only thing that matters is: Your pleasure.
      Thats fine, even if I would not do it in some cases.

      My two cents.
      Uwe

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      NeoRetro


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      Post #74445, posted on 02-08-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      I don’t see any problem with it, assuming they are presented as in-service aircraft, and not a diorama of the crash scene. I like to make models of aircraft that either mean something to me personally, or have historical significance. For example my AA Eastern L-188, which was involved in a bird strike accident in KBOS, and a AA United CV-340 which had an off-airport landing in 1964. I have also built models of planes that I flew in service, or at least trained on during my career, including the Comair EMB-120 N265CA which crashed in KDTW on 1/9/1997. That crash involved three good friends of mine and an airplane which I had flown many hours. I consider my model as a humble memorial to my colleagues and their passengers, and not creepy at all. The families of the lost might not see it that way, however. That being said, if it’s for your own collection, I’d say go for it.

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      Jennings


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      Post #74446, posted on 02-09-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      I have no problem with anyone building anything, but I still find it creepy. When you can change one number in the registrations and have exactly identical models of the same aircraft that weren't used as weapons in the worst terrorist attack in our history, haven't you accomplished the same thing? But whatever you want to do.

      I flew (twice) on the TWA 800 aircraft. I'd never in a million years want a model of it.

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      Thud105f


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      Post #74502, posted on 02-14-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      How about this. Creepy or no?
      Also book below.




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      Ken Miller


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      Post #74507, posted on 02-14-2020 GMT-5 hours    
      C'mon people...
      Building models called Boeing Killer?? Yea I find that creepy/offensive. Build what you want as you want? I'm not going to mention some ideas but I'm certain I or others can think up something really offensive with little thought involved. 9/11 planes? Building or seeing them on display would make me feel VERY SAD....I personally would have no reason to build them. On the flip side my Northwest Electra is the one that lost its wing(s) due to whirl mode so I have modeled planes that came to a tragic end.

      Ken