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      JEE3


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      Post #40492, posted on 12-22-2011 GMT-5 hours    

      By the late 1960's, most of the interchange routes were relegated to the airline history books but one of the few left, would bring the unusual site of a Pan American DC-8-62!
      N1803-Clipper "Golden Light" was leased by Pan American from January 1970-Ap. 1971 for use on the PA/BI South American interchange. It's quite possible that this leased -62 was the last to be newly painted with the full 'Pan American' titles, as the airline had begun to apply the shortened 'Pan Am' around this time period! This route dates back originally to the 1955 National-Pan American-Panagra interchange (New York-Miami-Panama-Buenos Aires) In it's last few years, it was now Miami-Panama-South America. Between 1967-69, Pan American sold off most of their original DC-8-32/33's (mostly to Delta & United). As Todd "Tango-Bravo" pointed out in the original '09 post , this route could have been flown by Braniff by this time but it would coming to an end later in 1971 anyways. Pan American's part of the interchange was the Miami-Panama City leg. The above photo was taken in January 1971 at Miami.
      After the interchange was ended in April 1971, the 'Pan American' -62 would soon disappear and it would appear that N1803 was to become one of the first A/C to be painted in the new '2-Tone' scheme!
      Being that the last 'Jellybeans' were the (3) ex-BWIA 727-078's, arriving in April-June 1971, N1803 might have been painted in a hybrid 'Jellybean' scheme, as the last of the 727-078's was in June, if the BI paint shop didn't yet have all the items for the new '2-Tone' scheme?.........John


      Images: Jon Proctor/George W. Hamlin (2)

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      Jennings


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      Post #40619, posted on 12-30-2011 GMT-5 hours    
      Okay, now that's cool!

      Anyone know for sure when PAA started using the small black "PAN AM" lettering up front instead of the full titles at mid-fuselage? I don't think that variant lasted long before the newer more stylized lettering was introduced.

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      Post #40631, posted on 12-31-2011 GMT-5 hours    
      I never was able to find any 1970 photos of the shortened "Pan Am" on any narrow-bodies, so it's quite possible that not only was the -62 the last DC-8 in the fleet but the last to have the classic "Pan American" titles applied on it?




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      Post #40641, posted on 12-31-2011 GMT-5 hours    
      So was the 747 the first and only type to carry the old lettering style "PAN AM" at the nose?? Interesting.

      J

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      Post #40667, posted on 01-01-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      In 1971, both 727's and 707's began to be seen with the "Pan Am" titles at the front. It looks like only the 747 had them during 1970. It does look like the leased DC-8-62 (N1803) was most likely the last to have the full "Pan American" titles applied to it (Jan. '70), which even makes that -62 even more historic! The only question I can think of is what style titles were applied to a newly repainted 707 or 727 that was coming out of an overhaul during 1970? We'll never know that for sure.......


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      Jeff Jarvis


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      Post #40842, posted on 01-10-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings!

      That's a nice photo, especially with the 720B partially in the foreground. Jet Clipper De Soto was a regular around the Latin America Division of PAA in the 1960's and I saw it in MIA and at PTY many times. The DC-8-62 N1803 was originally blue (before being painted in the PAA colors) and was the first of the DC-8-62's to be delivered to Braniff in 1967. The only place I ever saw it as Jet Clipper Golden Light in the Pan American scheme was at PTY.

      Tocumen was the best airport I ever saw for watching airplanes. The observation deck stretched the entire length of the terminal and adjacent ramp and covered every gate with no fences or obstructions to vision or photography of any kind. It was above the ceiling of the gates which were at ground level with no jetways, so you were at airplane door level for photography. In later years though there were small trees planted on the lawn in front of the ramp and those could get in the way as time passed and they grew taller. Things grow very fast in the tropics! The Tocumen of today is a typical modern terminal where you can't see much of anything and the old terminal is now used for freight. Although the newer runway appears to be asphalt, it is actually concrete. The black appearance is due to a mold which grows on concrete in the tropics.

      Later on I flew N1803 at Arrow Air both as a First Officer and then as a Captain. Early in its career with Braniff (late 1967) it landed long at UIO one morning in the rain and went off the north end of the runway and down into a ditch which twisted the nose slightly and Douglas sent a team to Ecuador to repair it in situ. The Braniff guys said it had a reputation after that of not trimming up quite right and feeling different in pitch, but I never noticed anything strange when I was flying it. I loved flying the -62 and we had several of the former Braniff airplanes.

      When the titles were shortened from PAN AMERICAN to PAN AM in the early 70's, they also started to leave JET off the Clipper names since the propeller driven airliners had been retired, thus JET CLIPPER DE SOTO became CLIPPER DE SOTO. The style of lettering remained the same until the late 70's when the run together lettering style Jennings mentioned was adopted on the fuselage and the blue globe.

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      Jeff Jarvis

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      Post #41121, posted on 02-02-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings!

      I'm going to have to eat a little crow here..... I went back and started checking resources because my memory was nagging at me..... The DC-8 that went off the runway at Quito was the second of the -62s delivered to Braniff, N1804 and not N1803. I flew both of them in the 1980's after the demise of Braniff, and if you saw the photos of the airplane off the end of the runway and down the hill at UIO, you would not believe how minimal the damage turned out to be. I'll bet it was an exciting ride for those in the front (cockpit) with the window view of where they were going, and I'd like to know how they got the airplane back up to the runway in one piece!

      If you look on airliners.net there is now a nice broadside photo of DC-8-62 N1804 several years later at PTY (Tocumen) at the old terminal in the jellybean blue scheme from that wonderful observation deck I mentioned in my previous post above.

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      Jeff Jarvis

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Post #41170, posted on 02-08-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      Greetings!

      In looking for any and all photos of N1804 off the runway at Quito, Ecuador on April 23, 1968 I discovered that they can be accessed by googling Braniff DC-8-62 photos and clicking on images for Braniff DC-8-62 photos at the top of the page and on page 2 click on the photovalet.com shot to see quite a few photos of the airplane in the mud downhill from the runway.

      If you want to see photos of N1804 in the blue jellybean and other aircraft at Tocumen in 1971 just go to airliners.net and type in Ger Buskermolen in keywords on the aviation photo search engine to see C-46, DC-6, DC-4 (C-54), Electra, HS-748, BAC 1-11 and lots of others. He has 121 photos in total.

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      Jeff Jarvis

      God's "Curse" to aviation!

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      Sergio Goncalves


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      Post #41172, posted on 02-08-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      John,

      Beautiful... Must have been magical to see this at the airport. Thanks,

      Sergio
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      Post #41174, posted on 02-08-2012 GMT-5 hours    
      Those Ger Buskermolen must have been just added recently! That LACSA One-Eleven wasn't there when I was working on the LACSA One-Eleven "LS". Some really RARE photos!! Thanks for the 'keyword'! I'm learning those famous (3) words...'Keep Checking Back'!



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      Post #48146, posted on 05-15-2013 GMT-5 hours    
      "LS" #65 had been updated not that long ago but I did add (2) additional photo's. When the last #65 update was posted, the photo that last of ex-BWIA 727's had not been posted, showing it in sort of a 'Jellybean' hybrid, so it becomes an interesting question as to how N1803 was initially re-painted after April 1971. I believe the first '2-Tone's don't begin to appear until August 1971? It would be interesting to find the earliest photo of N1803 after the Pan Am lease ended!



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      Post #49041, posted on 07-21-2013 GMT-5 hours    
      Here's my rendition of Clipper Golden Light...