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      Jennings


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      Post #53238, posted on 05-11-2014 GMT-5 hours    
      I recently did two long segments on Delta MD-90s (KMSP-KTUS and KTUS-KATL). On both flights I was seated behind the wing. And on both flights were in smooth air, I felt an up and down oscillation that I swear was bending in the fuselage! I could make myself believe I could see the aisle floor bending up and down. I know long airplanes bend, but that's usually in turbulence.

      Anyone ever experienced that on an MD-90 before??

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      Ken Miller


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      Post #53239, posted on 05-11-2014 GMT-5 hours    
      Can't help with any MD-90 flight time or experiencing fuselage/wing bending without turbulence but......look forward to reading anyone elses experiences.

      I've always found it interesting watching the fuselage and overhead bins flex independently on turbulent 737 flights. It's a good thing that things flex instead of staying straight.

      Ken

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      aptivaboy


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      Post #53247, posted on 05-12-2014 GMT-5 hours    
      I don't know if it was from turbulence, but its been mentioned on various aviation blogs and such that the DC/MD autopilot often put the plane on a somewhat noticeable porpoising path. Some pilots elected to fly the bird manually for longer due to this, before putting it into autopilot. I have no direct evidence of this, just anecdotal accounts I've read over the years. Perhaps this was the cause of what you saw?

      Bob

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      Jennings


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      Post #53254, posted on 05-12-2014 GMT-5 hours    
      Could well be. I was actually surprised nobody got sick because of it. If was that noticeable, at least to me. I guess being a pilot has it's disadvantages sometimes ;)

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      Flaptrack


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      Post #53270, posted on 05-14-2014 GMT-5 hours    
      nothin unusual J,
      you can see this phenomenon on the 753 even better. fuselages have to build elastic, otherwise all the stresses would cuase cracks etc. and the vertical G limits for landings were kind of 0!
      best way to watch it is to have an eye straight on the edge of an aisle seat... can be quite terrefic

      Atari

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      NX28388


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      Post #53271, posted on 05-14-2014 GMT-5 hours    
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      Ken Miller :
      I've always found it interesting watching the fuselage and overhead bins flex independently on turbulent 737 flights. It's a good thing that things flex instead of staying straight.



      I'll never forget one particular L-1011 ride from Atlanta to Fort Lauderdale in 2001 (aboard Delta's Ship 735, for those of you who keep track of things). We hit turbulence climbing out - one of those moments it felt like the airplane hit a tree stump - and it looked like the entire cabin and everything in it physically moved from side to side. I'd never seen it before, let alone on a widebody, and found it very surreal (although, granted, I really hadn't flown that much at that point in my life).

      Since someone mentioned the DC/MD family's porpoising characteristic, anyone who's flown on the ERJ-135/145 family probably knows about that mild wing-rocking oscillation it has (sometimes called the Honeywell Shuffle). I'd flown a lot on ERJs but never noticed it until Ralph, who has taken many a test/troubleshooting flight in his 20+ years working avionics in corporate aircraft, talked about it after his first ERJ trip a couple years back. I haven't been on an ERJ since, but the next time I am I imagine I'll be going "yep...there it is."

      Jodie Peeler

      In 1924 Wien was Alaska's first airline. In 1980 it still is.

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      727flyer


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      Post #53275, posted on 05-14-2014 GMT-5 hours    
      Jodie,

      Just curious how the Jungle Jet Wobble got the name Honeywell Shuffle (hadn't heard that one before)? I always assumed it was Dutch Roll that an inadequate yaw damper couldn't completely eliminate...

      Mike

      "Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue!"

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      Sparky


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      Post #53277, posted on 05-14-2014 GMT-5 hours    
      The worst I have experienced was on a DC-8-71,ATL-BDL in bad weather.
      Sparky

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      727flyer


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      Post #53278, posted on 05-14-2014 GMT-5 hours    
      The A340-600 can be an interesting experience in rough weather. Had an aisle seat toward the back of Economy. Got to watch the fuselage bend up and down, flex side to side, and twist - all at the same time. Overheads were moving in all sorts of directions. It's hard to tell for sure, but I think I ended up at times being 6-8 feet higher than the folks in the same aisle seats in First, and 6-8 feet to the right of them...

      That being said, having stairs down to a lower deck lav area was pretty cool.

      Mike

      "Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue!"

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      sky303


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      Post #53282, posted on 05-15-2014 GMT-5 hours    
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      Sparky :
      The worst I have experienced was on a DC-8-71,ATL-BDL in bad weather.
      Sparky



      I'll second the stretch-8...

      Rob Morales
      ATL

      Captain, you'll be in charge of this flight
      when I unhook the towbar!